About your Search

20130106
20130114
SHOW
( more )
STATION
CSPAN 30
MSNBCW 27
CSPAN2 22
CNNW 20
CNBC 17
MSNBC 12
FBC 11
KQED (PBS) 11
KGO (ABC) 9
KRCB (PBS) 8
CNN 7
KQEH (PBS) 7
SFGTV2 7
KRON (MyNetworkTV) 4
KNTV (NBC) 3
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 241
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 241 (some duplicates have been removed)
haven't followed the mayor wanted name, but if you look at labor, the environment playing out that way, a variety of social and cultural issues is always, importantly health care you mentioned is always the same coalition for certain stability there and a huge overlap and that's a terrific thing. >> is this interesting paper we see as part of the larger process of reallocation between state and federal government. how much leeway to see up on that administration have? i don't find very -- that would be fine if you had 2 million dvd agents is better than we do have, but how much room does the lord gave you? >> i think what all their shows as federalism is alive and well is the real of 60 kind of wandered the concepts in our country for obvious reasons, but even that term now is coming to be embraced by newer generation of something positive because you see controversial issues as you identified the address of the state level. that's a good thing happening here. it's easy when you're middle-aged man like me to brood about. the rule of law, what are we going to do? but we've had a lot of
to be so passionate about the environment specifically? >> because i have children, because the knowledge that we are devastating our national resources and that we continue to be addicted to the very thing that is killing us, fossil fuel, chemicals, power plants that are spewing fossil fuel, that we are addicted to them. they're killing us and we are not involved enough and there's not enough money behind alternative energy and there should have been. we could have done it, we haven't done it, we have to do it. global warming is happening. climate change is here. i don't want to be the person that doesn't talk about it. i don't want to be the person that denies it. there's too much science. there was a moment in the early 90s and that was when i had my first kid. i mean, this is really selfish, you know. i had my first kid and i thought, oh, my gosh. i started learning about what was really going on. they talked about greenhouse. remember, the time magazine said, "what is the greenhouse effect?" there was a moment where we were all really motivated and then i don't know what happened. pe
for years in the economy, and even our environment. as increased use of natural gas has reduced co2 emissions in the united states in 1992 levels. since 1990, the industry has invested more than $252 billion in improving the environmental performance of our products, our facilities, and our operations. between 2000-2010, the amount of industry investment for technologies to reduce greenhouse gases was $71 billion. compare that to the $43 billion spent by the federal government over that same time. compared to all other industries combined, which were just slightly larger than what our industry invested. u.s. refiners have invested more than $137 billion since 1990 in technologies to produce even cleaner fuels and meet the growing variety of state and federal mandates. it complete transitions compared to gasoline is estimated to have resulted in the reduction of tailpipe emissions by cars and light duty trucks, the equivalent of taking 164 million cars off the road. and through increased efficiency, we are doing much more with less. america uses about half as much energy today to pro
, as you point out, and what we are seeing is that the areas that have high lead in the environment also have low school scores, they are areas where the police are spending some time looking at in terms of high crime rates. that connection is clearly made when you start mapping. >> so there's at least three different layers of this research showing this connection. one is like the mapping of the relationships in the time they are occurring. the other is the time lag data about lead gasoline emissions and the kids who were exposed to it grow up, there's a crime wave. lead gasoline emissions go down. kids under the lower ones, there's lower crime. there's individual data about iq and blood levels. kevin, this report was terrifying to me. >> yeah. in addition to the statistical evidence, kids who grew up in the '50s, early' 40s and '50s. it affects their brain development. we have known for a long time lead affects iq and school scores. in the last ten years, there's a new line of evidence suggesting it affects areas of prefrontal cortex in the brain. those are areas that affect emotional
out space. it's so much easier to shut down a shop than it is in this environment. the colorado version of the law makes the law enforcement side of this much more challenging. >> and so the next thing that they could do is simply repeal it. and say if you're going to crack down on our regulatory system, we'll legalize without a regulatory system, then do what you can. >> you might notice that some of the initial ones were rebellious by nature. i think marijuana users describe themselves -- some of them have a distaste for it being legal because they're now abiding with the law. if what there is is a very aggressive response you're going to tap in their rebellious spirit. >> we're seeing a breakdown of a federal relationship. michael will give us a broader context than what we're seeing. >> there is a sort of tempting federalism prospect on this which sees something along the following lines. and angela alluded to this. look, the resurgence of american federalism because states have preferences here. there's no reason. let's experiment. i don't think that's necessarily wrong. bu
and how to give actionable advice requires knowing, and i would argue working in, environments that require close cooperation. that is why our job is not to wait for legal questions to be brought to us or to provide advice on operational decisions after those decisions have been made. our job is to be present at the beginning and throughout the process. just like other senior national security official across the government, the person in my seat, since the creation of nsd, has attended the morning terrorism threat briefing along with the attorney-general and the director of the fbi. just like the analysts and special agents who are working these issues, we aim to stay on top of the threat picture and to help devise tactics and strategies and tools for getting ahead of it. today its standard -- it is standard procedure for agents conducting counterterrorism investigations to consult throughout the process with attorneys and prosecutors in the national security division. that is to ensure that all potential avenues for destruction of a threat, intelligence gathering, investigati
business. the combination of policies that are not hostile to business and an environment which actually welcomes new businesses and new jobs is working. it is clear. in a competitive world, policies matter. companies have choices. job-creators have choices. that is why our work is far from done. that is why a top priority must be to continue new jersey's record of excellence in education and to fix problems where we are failing. in higher education, the task force led with skill by former governor tom kean has helped us develop strategies for making new jersey's institutions more competitive. we need to turn new jersey's universities -- including rutgers -- from good to great, because that will help us keep more talented new jersey students in new jersey and will strengthen the link between higher education and high quality jobs. at the heart of these reforms we need, of course, is the plan to make sure that new jersey's critically important medical and health sciences institutions remain world class. by merging rutgers and umdnj in the north and rowan and umdnj's stratford campus in th
participation. how society and in these environments as the bonds weren't as strong as they were in traditionally organized places. these are arguments for a long time. design, aesthetic and social arguments. but then a big change has been 15 years ago, the economy started talking. nobody listens to planners. which is shouting in the wind about why we feel certain things are certain ways. but i will miss them so me say say this'll make you poor and this make you richer. the.or started saying, these communities are killing us, which i begin to and finally even more recently the environmentalists figured out the city was the way to save the country and the countryside. those three issues, none of which original research on our parts form the basis for having a much more legitimate and arguable support for city life over suburban life. so what are they? the first question to ask is where do people want to be in america? in portland is a prime example. during the 90s, journal and neil population increased by 50%, which was five times the rate. educated no one else went up so much ire
. where do you see this going? you talk about ticket prices going up a minimum 10%. in this environment it could go up more than that, couldn't it? >> absolutely. no question about it. the reality is if we don't have the seats out there, what is left will be exceeded by the demand and that means it going to go up. the other challenge, we have the regional unquote airlines. you have to pay probably three quarters of a million dollars to get trained just to get the privilege of riding as a copilot and living in newark and getting paid $30,000 a year. that doesn't encourage a lot of new entrants. >> neil: i guess not. michael boyd on all things flying or in this case not flying. i think abe lincoln just turned in his grave. nancy pelosi now using an amendment he all but inspired to bury us all. i'm william devane. ♪ i wish my patients could see what i see. ♪ that over time, having high cholesterol and any of these risk factors can put them at increased risk for plaque buildup inheir arteries. so it's even more important to lower their cholesterol, and that's why, when diet and exercise
's happening in our immediately environment and what we can see around us and what literally touches us physically. if you're walking through e woods d you hearhe crack of a stick behind you, your body immediately goes into a fear response, a fight or flight response. climate change isn't that kind of a problem. it's not an immediate, visceral threat. and i can say right now, this very day we can look out the window and there's co2, carbon dioxide, pouring out of tailpipes, pouring out of buildings, pouring out of smokestacks. and yet we can't see it, it's invisible. the fundamental causes of this global problem are invisible to us. and likewise the impacts are largely invisible to us as well unless you know where to look. so it's a problem that first of all we can't see. and secondly it's a problem that is seemingly faceless. it's not like terrorists who we can imagine who are coming after us trying to kill us and challenge our fundamental values. it's a problem that we can't see, that's going to have long term impacts that aren't going to just impact us now, but impact us into the fut
. economic growth is far from robust. another big problem is the low interest rate environment. >> essentially the challenge is the spread between what they can pay for deposits and what they can earn on loans because of these very low interest rates is compressed. that makes earning money difficult. >> reporter: that said, some argue it's a good time to buy bank stocks because valuations are still relatively cheap. at 11.2, the financial sector has the lowest price to earnings ratio of any group, based on projected 2013 earnings. jim sinegal isn't impressed. >> there's good reason banks should trade at lower multiple than other sectors. there's a lot of risk there. a lot of leverage and banks aren't going to be as profitable going forward as they were in the past. >> reporter: investors will be watching friday for more hints about the health of the sector. that's when wells fargo will become the first of the big banks to release fourth quarter numbers. erika miller, "n.b.r.," new york. >> tom: still ahead, tonight's "word on the street," electronics. how semiconductor giant in
are two of his "ten predictions" for 2013. >> so the key, susie, is we're in an environment where stocks continue to climb walls of worry, and the economy continues to muddle through, not similar to last year. last year the economy some days okay, some days not so okay, and the stock market kept climbing that wall of worry. last year stocks were up 16%, s&p 500, and we only need about half that to achieve a new all-time high. i think we'll get there. >> susie: bob, how do markets go higher when the individual investor is out of the picture, so fearful of investing in stocks. do we see the return of the individual this year? >> i wish i could say we're going to see that, susie. but the individuals who own a lot of bonds first need to see bonds going down in price to be willing to sell them to buy stocks. i think we hit a new all-time high without much participation by the individual. it is the corporation itself that has the big burially since the become oof 09. >> susie: you believe the emerging markets are going to do better than the u.s. so should investors focus outside the u.s.? >> i
mechanics beyond the traditional game environment. >> he suggested letting the readers vote on each other's postings so they could identify whose was most respected. >> a little light bulb, number one, one person thought his comment was insightful. >> by using this reputation system, the idea would be that entire community could work together to determine who should we pay attention to. >> each commentator gets more votes, they receive trophy badges. letting other readers know who is most popular. this in turn gets others engaged and it begins to feel like a game. >> whenever we engage with any kind of system, we ask what's in it for me? you better have a go ahead answer for that question, or it's empty and meaningless and people won't stay engaged. >> that kind of community recognition can be highly valuable, but it's also something that can't be bought for money. >> we were hitting little under 1 million page views per month at that time in '06. and today over this summer, we crossed the 6 million mark. it's been a very rapid increase in how much people are actually using it. >> part of
of russia being their sole supplier. in this environment, subsidizing wind and solar makes no sense. also five years ago, we thought that china and india, and other emerging economies, my sign-on to emissions reductions, and, therefore, that if we reduced emissions, perhaps global temperatures would be reduced. and i don't think it does but i don't tak take a position on whr mandated emissions caused global warming or not, but if we are reducing our emissions and china and india, which make up 37% of the worlds population, are not doing so, when i pointed any affect on the global temperatures. and then the first chapter of the book i talk about geoengineering solutions, that nobel prize-winning weiner thinks we can reduce global temperature if we just do it on our own. painting russ whitehurst like the sun's rays. what we are doing with a 12 and dollars were spent on alternative energy is pushing people into cars that they don't want to buy, we are raising electricity costs. we are -- we're getting rid of incandescent lightbulbs in favor of fluorescent lightbulbs. and the cost of this fal
an interesting expression. she said, i grew up in an environment that was christian in which people followed their christian religion, others followed their muslim religion, and others their african superstitions. for me, this went to the heart of why the book was inevitable, or why, for me, i was engaged this this discourse all my life. it's very strange. i found it very interesting today, close to 80, i should actually exist in an environment in which for admitting what i believe or for believing what i do not believe to be considered of what i call terminal censorship. now, go back to the history, and i don't mean just me personally. i'm talking about the society in which i live, in which i was raised, the history of my people as i now write in the book, when the european explorers, of course, always quickly followed by religious storm troopers, the missionaries came to africa on the mission of conversion, they had a very serious problem, and that was they could not find satan. they couldn't find the denver. now, if you want to convert people, you have to persuade them that they -- that t
justice. but if we can't have environments where students feel comfortable attending school, being comfortable with themselves and in themselves in a school environment we will never have students that are predicated in a way to be able to learn. we have to have safe schools. so what we did this year, when all of our administrators came back from summer break, every administrator from principals to the purchasing manager, everyone saw bully this year. and we spent a full year with our bifl department of student, family and community resources, we spent a full day debriefing that movie and going through a process where we talked about it and it was amazing to see grown adults having these realizations about what bullying meant to them and having a commitment from every administrator in our district that we will not allow that to happen this year and that will be one of the focus areas this year. so the ability to have these children now watch the movie as well was extremely moving to us yesterday. i just have to share one anecdote from that movie. we had a question and answer ses
are two of his "ten predictions" for 2013. >> so the key, susie is we're in an environment where stocks continue to climb walls of worry, and the economy continues to muddle through, not similar to last year. last year the economy some days okay some days not so okay, and the stock market kept climbing that wall of worry. last year stocks were up 16%, s&p 500, and we only need about half that to achieve a new all-time high. i think we'll get there. >> susie: bob how do markets go higher when the individual investor is out of the picture so fearful of investing in stocks. do we see the return of the individual this year? >> i wish i could say we're going to see that susie. but the individuals who own a lot of bonds first need to see bonds going down in price to be willing to sell them to buy stocks. i think we hit a new all-time high without much participation by the individual. it is the corporation itself that has the big burially since the become ofof 09. >> susie: you believe the emerging markets are going to do better than the u.s. so should investors focus outside the u.s.? >> i th
, not dumping chemicals bad for the environment, a growing vegetables, how can that be something in violation? >> is a head scratcher. the municipal code is about political power. and right now stay at home gardening is on the rise so more cities will overturn the code but do we want to fight to grow our garden? gerri: it should be a given. more and more cases like this house are the courts responding? >> it is heartening. it is disturbing because property rights are a cornerstone of liberty you can say this is mine and you cannot say anything about it. with eminent domain of use and the epa is a huge violator have been doing a pretty good job they have been slapped down to the epa because they declared someone's land a wetland in you cannot challenge this while be fine you $75,000 per day. gerri: we heard about that. i knew about them in the domain. good reasons and very bad reasons. can and should americans fight back? >> absolutely. politics is messy but one rule is they will find the easiest path to get what they want. there is the case next week involving a guy who had a permit the city
presentations. we tend to work in rural areas comes i'm happy to hear about urban environment and what's going on. two questions for lives. i have recently chose to the ghostly the ghostly causa schemata was interesting is how communities are popping up across the street. somewhat ironic that are in fact there's no services out there. i'm wondering in the long term from its landing% is, communities, huge communities in areas with little resources, what is the long-term plan for these communities that do also include sort of the dwellers to vent hopes for what they want to be living. that's the first question. to bring services to them for help relocate again and how does that work? the second question -- i was sort of in knowing how you got to where you got to. i feel it in the spaghetti or is so often the government is not interested in addressing because there's so many entrenched and powerful interests. so i'm interested in knowing more about how you saw that movie forward. >> i'll answer your second question first because it's a little easier, which is included around the table with the pe
think they represent necessarily the average parent who i think would prefer an environment where their child wasn't exposed to that kind of risk. >> vice president biden of course is working really hard at this and is meeting with a lot of groups. and speaking of federal law, would you be more comfortable if this was a federal law that would make it so that public schools could not have teachers who were armed or do you believe that should be up to the local districts? >> i think this needs to be a national consensus. i think we need a federal law on that. i don't -- i don't believe that -- if you create anomalous environments where those things are available, you have too much bleed thru, i think we need to have consistency across this. parents should feel comfortable regardless of where they live. >> rhonda, has there been any student reaction to this? what is their takeaway knowing the teachers in their schools may be secretly armed? >> well, i mean, you used the word "secretly." but we do have, as was mentioned, the law in the entire state of utah. and the bottom line is we a
environment so attractive and really few alternatives. is it really a function of the global economy, or is it more a function of this money that needs to find a place to go and u.s. equities seems to be best looking game in town? >> well, you know, i do think it's a lill bit of the latter. when you start looking at the velocity of the money, not trying to get too into the financial jargon, but we do have an issue where people are still seeking out safe money. however, if you look at growth of bank lending, commercial bank lending, what we call a credit growth, it's above 6% right now, so we do have banking and financial organizations wanting to lend money, and as they do that, that's going to create the capital to give those fundamentals that we sort of have forgotten about, but there's no denying that when the federal reserve is printing 85 billion a month it will have an effect. keep in mind, still looking at 8%, 10%, s&p corporate earnings growth. let's not get into an argument about top line growth. >> you're talking about the fourth quarter, 8% to 10% in the fourth quarter? >>
in the state of the union to work together. we have tried to create an environment where we would be able to work on things that have historically been challenging, but i think we need to do both. >> i think i am out of time. >> we will get the clock fixed. >> thank you for your service, mr. chairman. i want to draw attention to the last time you came before this committee. it was an unusual time were you did not just talk about a balanced budget, but as you referenced, you working with president clinton and this conference -- and this congress produced a balanced budget, something that no other president before or since has done in decades. our republican colleagues, when they took over instead of building on that success, they squandered that success. they never met a tax break that they did not like and they believed in the alchemy that those tax breaks would not for pay for themselves. that in addition to the tax breaks that they advanced, they advanced one increase in spending after another, increasing spending at an incredible rate without wanting to pay for it. after eight years of
for the women to be heard. it's an old boy's network and some describe it as a hostile work environment toward women, that the president does some business and bonding at his basketball games which are all male and there's a way that you could sort of set yourself up to be arm's length from the top women in the white house, to when you get to the big decision making moment, oh, i just don't know any top qualified women. >> well, i think one of the challenges he has, you have to look at him, the father of two minority women, and in the case of even my own family, my father, while he makes great, you know, tries to try to include more women he's naturally in most cases gravitates toward men, the same way i gravitate towards other women talking about challenges in my life. and that's one of the challenges that corporations and law firms are looking at heavily, how do we address this in a way that men and women are comfortable relying on each other. book to pipeline, hillary clinton did raise a daughter and did so with a lot of help around and a lot of women going into the senior roles are having
mentioned, the things america needs to do to stay competitive in this challenging economic environment, domestically and globally? >> absolutely. first, you've got to get through the fiscal issues. balance in the deficit and budgets, number one. and then we need to get to tax reform. it is a big deal. there has not been a major renovation to the tax code since 1986, and that is before the internet. immigration is a big deal. getting the kids in school today studying the sciences and technology and engineering and the math to stay in this country and getting a path to his citizenship and dealing with the competencies' to grow jobs. if you can deal with those issues, we would be off to a great start. >> you have many of your clients in the manufacturing business. looking at the broader economic shift, what do you do in a post- manufacturing world to provide the numbers of jobs that america needs? because it does not appear clear yet. >> we have roughly 12 million jobs through the great recession lost. we have filled about half of those. it will still take some more between five-seven yea
the case be made for all women in a college environment? you have been the president of such a school. >> one of the things people think is a single sex school is all women. we have some male professors. the tilt is female, but we have male professors. they are not sitting in a convent. you have other school that are close by. so, none of these children or young people are being koiserred. it's an important point to make. a lot of them think they are going to be. however, i think there are lots of benefits. there are some disadvantages. there are 4,000 plus colleges in the united states. 4,000. you have clernlg colleges for african-american. 45 women's colleges. you have one founded for jewish people, why not variety? i didn't go to a single sex school. a lot of women who are achievers didn't. some want to make that choice. they want to learn and be focused. they want to have the opportunity to learn without the distraction of young men in the room and they are being prepared to go into a world with all the tools that make them unintimidated by men. they have learned how to argument.
is republicaning off through the subdivision much faster. it's a dynamic environment and we're not arming people with the information and we're not arming people with the facts that they need to be purchasing flood insurance. >> and the other problem we have particularly with respect to insurance is not just flood insurance. we've had homeowners all across the region fighting with their insurance companies right now and we're finding people with insurance and who think they have the coverage to protect their home, forget about the flood insurance, in jn, wind damage or hurricane damage or content are finding that they either don't have -- their insurance company the not responding to them. that's a conic problem. most people are underinsured. it's an industry on people betting against themselves. you hope you never need it and the insurance companieses are not in the business of paying out claims and their goal is to keep the money you gave them. they don't want to pay it out and we're finding that people think they have a particular level of coverage but when you delve into their insurance poli
competitive environment from which to go out and compete around the world and win. host: one thing we heard leading up to discussions late last year is that some type of certainty was needed from decisions made. did the people you represent find the guest: certainty there is some of it. much is to be done because long- term overhang is still serious. nobody believes that our current spending course is sustainable. we have made promises that cannot be paid for. maybe not tomorrow or five years from now, but down the road changes need to be made. you're seeing this at the state level where governors and in both parties and legislative bodies are coming together. watch illinois right now, they are struggling with their pension debt, but at the national level we have not had the success yet that some of the states of had. host: looking at spending federally, what has to be guest::the first quarter this year is one that debate will take place. you have the debt ceiling, a continuing resolution. at the end of march, the year is half over. did you have sequestration mandated. those are all intertw
country's most vulnerable people that we create healthy environments and green spaces and by country men and women become fully conscious of their ability to change things for the better. >> baptist from haiti. my wish is for more justice, economic as well as social justice, starting with the recognition that poverty is not a sin. >> i wish for wish for a world without boarders and walls, age 53, argentina. [ applause ] >> i wish for a world where the children are more just and more kind and fair in the world than the one we know. president, barack obama. >> and now, this is a good one, that donna and i can very strongly identify with. i wish that male fashion designers would be forced to wear the things that they create for women like stelleto heals and it gets better. and that all politicians would have to live by the rules and laws they come up with for the rest of us like the ones on food stamps and the minimum wage by isabel, ienda >> i promise that i will not take my clothes off in public. >> i wish it would snow in the morning so nobody does not have to go to school for two weeks,
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 241 (some duplicates have been removed)